The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7)

The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) at QAG and GOMA
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7)

A few weeks ago while I was in the city, I impulsively decided to check out the The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at GOMA and QAG. While I was a little rushed (I had about 45 minutes), I managed to see nearly all of the artwork from the exhibition.

The Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT) is the only exhibition in the world to exclusively display art from Asia, the Pacific and Australia. In GOMA, the artwork will instantly hit you as you enter the doors while other artists can be found in select areas of QAG.

Below are some (crappy phone) photos of my favourites art pieces. Because I was rushed, I forgot to take down the artists’ names for some of the artwork ^^;;. I’ve managed to track down most of details but if you see any mistakes, let me know!

The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Entrance into 0-Now: Traversing West Asia
Entrance into 0-Now: Traversing West Asia section featuring artists Cevdet Erek, Erbossyn Meldibekov, Almagul Menlibayeva, Hrair Sarkissian, Wael Shawky, Slavs and Tatars and Oraib Toukan (in QAG)
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Painted wall - part The Kuda: The Untold Story of Indonesian Underground Music in the 70s
The large painted that was part of The Kuda: The Untold Story of Indonesian Underground Music in the 70s (in QAG)
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Display from The Kuda: The Untold Story of Indonesian Underground Music in the 70s by
One of the displays from The Kuda: The Untold Story of Indonesian Underground Music in the 70s. This collection documents how the Indonesian punk band’s visit to Brisbane influenced the city itself (in QAG)
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Ressort by Huang Yong Ping
Ressort by Huang Yong Ping
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Korumbo (Spirit House) by the Brikiti Cultural group / Abelam people.
The first thing you’ll see when walking into GOMA. Korumbo (Spirit House) by the Brikiti Cultural group/Abelam people.
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Arawe, Sulka, Pomio and Kwoma Cultural Group cravings and masks
Work by artists from Papua New Guinea. From left to right – Arawe, Sulka, Pomio and Kwoma Cultural Groups
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Koromb Structure by Kwoma arts
My personal favourite piece – Koromb Structure by Kwoma arts. There’s a good time lapse of the structure being put together below.

The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - The Trinity Series by Uji Handoko Eko Saputro (aka Hahan)
The Trinity Series by Uji Handoko Eko Saputro (aka Hahan). Depicting the artist, the curator and the wealthy collector.
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Big Artist is a Big Factory by Uji Handoko Eko Saputro (aka Hahan)
Big Artist is a Big Factory by Uji Handoko Eko Saputro (aka Hahan)
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Paradise Lost by Raqib Shaw.
Paradise Lost by Raqib Shaw. As you can see, this image is huge!
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Detail of Paradise Lost by Raqib Shaw (source: The age)
Detail of Paradise Lost by Raqib Shaw (source: The Age)
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Two paintings from the Lounge Room Tribalism series by Graham Fletcher.
Two paintings from the Lounge Room Tribalism series by Graham Fletcher.
The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7) - Big Yellow by Richard Maloy
Big Yellow by Richard Maloy. All made with cardboard.

I would highly recommend going to see the exhibit but if you want to read every blurb and fully absorb every artwork (which you should), set aside a couple of hours. The exhibition is open till the 14th of April and admission is free. For full details check out the QAGOMA website. Here’s hoping I get a chance to go back and see it again ^_^.

P.S – QAGOMA also has a large range of videos from the artists involved in APT7. You can check them out in the QAGOMA TV section.

One comment on “The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT7)

  1. Pingback: Papua New Guinea Sacred Objects as Art in APT7 | Sylvie Riches

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